Serlachius museot

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+358 (0)3 488 6800 | Gustaf, R. Erik. Serlachiuksen katu 2 | Gösta, Joenniementie 47 | Mänttä

Open wintertime 1 September–31 May Tue–Sun 11am–6pm.

Sulje

+358 (0)3 488 6800 | Gustaf, R. Erik. Serlachiuksen katu 2 | Gösta, Joenniementie 47 | Mänttä

Open
wintertime 1 September–31 May Tue–Sun 11am–6pm
summertime 1 June–31 August daily 10am–6pm
Closed 6 Dec, 24–25 Dec, 31 Dec, 25 Mar and 30 Apr

Feel free to
come farther

Friday 4. November 2016

Marita Liulia´s exhibition Golden Age opens at Serlachius Museums, Finland

Marita Liulia is an internationally renowned and exceptionally versatile artist and director. Her exhibition Golden Age opens at Serlachius Museums on 5th November 2016. Serlachius Museums launch its Finland 100 Years celebrations with Liulia’s theme.

Golden Age refers to the creative period of Marita Liulia since the exhibition presents around one hundred new works: paintings, photographs, short films and sculptures. Gold, which connects the works together, is seen in many forms and meanings.

In Finnish art, the term Golden Age refers to the period prior to Finland’s independence, when artists created a Finnish identity for the country. For a dialogue with her own works, Liulia has selected master works of the Golden Age. Also on display will be Helene Schjerfbeck’s painting The Red Haired Girl II, only recently acquired by Gösta Serlachius Fine Arts Foundation.

Liulia defines Finland’s second Golden Age as the period from the 1970s, when a small country rose quickly to become one of the world’s most advanced and affluent nations. “But what does Golden Age mean today? Does art create a national wellbeing that is mental, physical, economic and communal? Or in an era of individualism, is Golden Age also personal?” asks the artist.

Liulia’s large-scale paintings, often created with her bare hands, are inspired by Finnish nature. World events, democratic crises, natural disasters, bomb strikes and the plight of refugees are also present in the works.

Part of the exhibition is a series of portraits of new and native Finns. The photographs have been taken at the artist’s black table, where the turning points and golden ages of life have been discussed. “Great insight is often preceded by disaster. People are stories, and every story is fascinating. Now the time has arrived to focus on Finnishness,” says the artist, who has travelled the world her entire adult life and has exhibited her works in 50 countries.

A series of short films and a large sculptural installation have emerged alongside the photographs and paintings. Marita Liulia works in a museum the same way as she does in a theatre, so the exhibition under preparation is an experiential, holistic work of art.

Exhibition Golden Age is open 5 November 2016 – 23 April 2017.
Serlachius Museums are open in wintertime 1 September – 31 May Tue-Sun 11 am–6 pm.

More information: Artist, Director Marita Liulia, +358 40 833 8944, marita@maritaliulia.com
Serlachius Museums: Information Officer Susanna Yläjärvi, +358 50 560 0156, susanna.ylajarvi@serlachius.fi


Thursday 22. September 2016

Marita Liulia´s exhibition Golden Age to the Serlachius Museums, Finland

Marita Liulia is an internationally renowned and exceptionally versatile artist and director. She has been invited to hold a solo exhibition in Serlachius Museum Gösta from 5 November 2016 until 23 April 2017. Liulia’s theme is Golden Age, with which the museum will launch its Finland 100 Years celebrations.

Golden Age refers to the creative period of the artist, because the exhibition will present around one hundred new works: paintings, photographs, short films and sculptures. Gold, which connects the works, is seen in many forms and meanings.

In Finnish art, the term Golden Age refers to the period prior to Finland’s independence, when artists created a Finnish identity for the country. For a dialogue with her own works, Liulia has selected master works of the Golden Age from Serlachius Museums’ collection. Also on display will be Helene Schjerfbeck’s painting The Red Haired Girl II, only recently acquired by Gösta Serlachius Fine Arts Foundation.

Liulia defines Finland’s second Golden Age as the period from the 1970s, when a small country rose quickly to become one of the world’s most advanced and affluent nations.

“But what does Golden Age mean today? Does art create a national wellbeing that is mental, physical, economic and communal? Or in an era of individualism, is Golden Age also personal?” asks the artist.

Liulia’s large-scale paintings, often created with her bare hands, are inspired by Finnish nature. World events, democratic crises, natural disasters, bomb strikes and the plight of refugees are also present in the works. The stories associated with the paintings are presented both in the exhibition and in a book Golden Age, published simultaneously.

Part of the exhibition is a series of portraits of new and indigenous Finns. The photographs have been taken at the artist’s black table, where the turning points and golden ages of life have been discussed.

“Great insight is often preceded by disaster,” observes Liulia. “People are stories, and every story is fascinating. Now the time arrived to focus on Finnishness,” says the artist, who has travelled the world her entire adult life and has exhibited her works in 50 countries.

A series of short films and a large sculptural installation have emerged alongside the photographs and paintings. Marita Liulia works in a museum the same way as she does in a theatre, so the exhibition under preparation is an experiential, holistic work of art, in whose creation a scenographer and light designer have participated.


More information: Artist, Director Marita Liulia, +358 40 833 8944, marita@maritaliulia.com
Serlachius Museums: Information Officer Susanna Yläjärvi, +358 50 560 150, susanna.ylajarvi@serlachius.fi


Friday 27. May 2016

Mark Wallinger exhibition opens in Serlachius Museums, Finland

An exhibition of award-winning artist Mark Wallinger opens to the public in Serlachius Museums, Finland on 28 May 2016. Mark Wallinger Mark is partly a retrospective exhibition, but it also includes new output of the artist. This is the first time that Wallinger’s art has been seen on this scale in Finland.

The exhibition is opening in Mänttä-Vilppula, a small town surrounded by forests and lakes in Central Finland. Mänttä, which developed around the paper industry in the late 19th century, has undergone industrial restructuring and in recent years has risen to become one of Finland’s most important art towns. Behind this development is the Gösta Serlachius Fine Arts Foundation and its museum activities, which have grown rapidly.

Two years ago, a major extension, the Pavilion, was built at Serlachius Museum Gösta. The Pavilion, designed by Barcelona architectural studio MX_SI, is representative of modern timber-frame construction. The building has attracted international attention and received a number of awards in Finnish and international architectural competitions.

Mark Wallinger Mark also extends from the internal premises into the park surrounding the art museum. In addition, the wall of the paper mill, which is still operating in Mänttä, will display a multi-level self-portrait of Mark – a large ‘letter I’ banderol. Throughout the summer, a similar banderol will also adorn the wall of the former Finlayson textile factory, located in Tampere, 90 kilometres away.

Humankind at the heart of Wallinger’s art

The Wallinger exhibition has a total of 40 works: paintings, sculptures, installations and video works from the period 1999–2016. The exhibition also includes one of the artist’s most famous works Ecce Homo (1999–2000), which was displayed in Trafalgar Square, London at the turn of the millennium. In addition, the artist will create for the exhibition an installation that will only be seen in Mänttä.

Timo Valjakka, the curator of the exhibition, says that Mark Wallinger is a surprising, inventive, profound and astonishingly versatile artist, who is known for never repeating himself.

“He is also a political artist, but indirectly, as if through mirrors or double meanings. He does not preach, but again and again presents questions about individual identity and all the social, cultural and political power structures that govern us and accordingly make us what we are. Recent events in Europe have made Mark’s art of even greater current interest,” emphasises Valjakka.

Valjakka believes that Wallinger’s art, which largely addresses very British themes, will also resonate with Finnish viewers. “At the heart of his work is humankind, and that’s why it is universal. It may not be easy, but good art always challenges its viewers.

Mark Wallinger Mark is open in Mänttä from 28 May–9 October 2016. The exhibition will continue from Finland to Edinburgh and Dundee in Scotland, where it will be seen in spring 2017. The exhibition partners are the Fruitmarket Gallery in Edinburgh and Dundee Contemporary Arts in Dundee as well as Hauser & Wirth Gallery in London.


Thursday 29. October 2015

Helene Schjerfbeck’s work Robber at the Gate of Paradise to Serlachius Museums in Finland

Gösta Serlachius Fine Arts Foundation has acquired Helene Schjerfbeck’s painting Robber at the Gate of Paradise. The work, acquired from Christie´s auction house in a private sale, successfully complements the series of Schjerfbeck male images in the Fine Arts Foundation’s collection.

Helene Schjerfbeck painted the Robber at the Gate of Paradise in 1924–1925, just before she moved from Hyvinkää to Tammisaari. The model was a local farmer, Alku Jaakkola. The model’s beauty moved the artist away from the original theme: a Christ figure transformed into a robber for whom the gate of Paradise does not open.

The Robber at the Gate of Paradise was in its time an exceptional male image. Schjerfbeck painted it at the age of 62. The artist depicts her half-naked male model idealising his fleshly beauty in a way that was unique for a female artist at that time.

In autumn 1924, the artist wrote to her friend Maria Wiik: “I’ve begun to paint ‘The Back’, a local farmer has sat as my model twice already. How beautiful it is, such a strong muscular back.” She mentioned the painting on a couple of other occasions in her later letters: “I’ll leave ‘The Back’ as a study, because overpainting it will weaken everything.”

Although the Robber at the Gate of Paradise is among Schjerfbeck’s most interesting paintings of the 1920s, it is not widely known, as it was for a long time in the ownership of one family. The work was shown, however, in an exhibition at the Nationalmuseum in Stockholm in 1944 and in a memorial exhibition held in honour of the artist at the Kunsthalle Helsinki in 1946. The work has also been shown in Schjerfbeck exhibitions in Lübeck in 1969, at the Helsinki Art House in 1980, at the Ateneum Art Museum in 1992 and in Frankfurt in 2014.

The Gösta Serlachius Fine Arts Foundation already had a series of well-known male images painted by Schjerfbeck: Young Man, c. 1882, Death of Wilhelm von Schwerin, 1927 and Motorist Måns Schjerfbeck 1929.

Artwork details:
Schjerfbeck, Robber at the Gate of Paradise, 1924–1925, oil and tempera on canvas, 83.5 x 62.5 cm, Gösta Serlachius Fine Arts Foundation.

For further information, please contact:
Pauli Sivonen, Director of Serlachius Museums tel. +358 50 566 1355 pauli.sivonen@serlachius.fi
Tarja Talvitie, Head of Collections tel. +358 40 638 6700, tarja.talvitie@serlachius.fi


Friday 2. October 2015

Major Anselm Kiefer exhibition to open at Serlachius Museums in Finland

An exhibition Anselm Kiefer – Works from the Grothe Collection, presenting the output of Anselm Kiefer, one of leading artists of our time, opens to the public on 3 October 2015 at the Serlachius Museums in Finland. Finland’s first extensive Kiefer exhibition will completely fill the art museum’s new, internationally acclaimed extension, the Pavilion.

The Serlachius Museums’ exhibition includes nearly 30 monumental works from the collection of Hans Grothe. The exhibition has been produced by Stiftung für Kunst und Kultur in Bonn, and it is curated by the foundation’s director, Walter Smerling.

Anselm Kiefer is a storyteller, whose themes are drawn from history, literature and philosophy. The themes of his works relate, for example, to painful episodes in the history of Germany and of Europe as a whole. Kiefer's works are huge and very heavy. In thick layers of paint, the artist combines cement, sand, lead, ash, plants or even barbed wire. His relief-like works form a memorable ensemble in conjunction with the Pavilion’s acclaimed architecture.

Only individual works of Anselm Kiefer have been seen in Finland before the Serlachius Museums’ exhibition. In the Nordic countries, his art was last shown on such an extensive scale at the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art in Denmark five years ago.

A collector who loves stories

Hans Grothe (b. 1930) is a German businessman and art collector, who over the decades acquired an extensive art collection. In 2005, however, he sold most of his collection and only kept Anselm Kiefer’s works. Since then, he has collected solely Kiefer’s monumental works.

The works of the Grothe collection have been exhibited earlier in Spain, the Netherlands and Germany. All the exhibitions have been different, however, in terms of scope and hanging. The exhibition in Finland is more extensive than any of the previous ones, because Hans Grothe has added to his collection after each exhibition. The intention is for the collection to be permanently housed at the Kunsthalle Mannheim in Germany in 2017.

Serlachius Museums – a strong name in contemporary art

The Serlachius Museums are located in the small town of Mänttä in Central Finland. Mänttä, which developed around the paper industry in the late 19th century, has undergone industrial restructuring, but in recent years has risen to become one of Finland’s best known art towns.

The image of the art town is enhanced by the Gösta Serlachius Fine Arts Foundation, which has operated for over 80 years and maintains two museums in Mänttä. The Serlachius Museums are known for their important collection of works from the Finland’s Golden Age of art. Through the art museum’s extension, which opened in summer 2014, the Serlachius Museums have also become a strong player in the field of contemporary art.

The art museum’s wood-constructed Pavilion has attracted international attention and received a number of awards in Finnish and international architectural competitions. The Pavilion was designed by the Barcelona studio MX_SI, which won an international competition on the museum extension held in 2010–2011.

The Anselm Kiefer exhibition is open at the Serlachius Museums from 3 October 2015 to 24 April 2016.

The Serlachius Museums are open in the winter season, 1 September–31 May, from Tuesday to Sunday 11 am–6 pm.

Further information:

Director of Serlachius Museums, Pauli Sivonen, tel. +358 50 566 1355 or pauli.sivonen@serlachius.fi